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Nobuya MINAMI
Global Industrial and Social Progress Research Institute



Established in December 1988, the Global Industrial and Social Progress Research Institute (GISPRI) has conducted research on the global environment, natural resources and other topics to explore possibilities for new international systems and optimal relationships between industry, economy, culture and society, with a view to providing comprehensive policy proposals to the government and the business community. In addition, GISPRI has, since April 2007, taken over the projects to succeed and develop the basic philosophy of the EXPO 2005 from the Japan Association for the 2005 World Exposition, Aichi, Japan.

In the eighth year of the 21st century, both national and international climates surrounding Japan have become increasingly grim and disruptive. The Japanese economy has been suffering from the first-ever deflation among developed countries after WWII, although an exit seems to be on the horizon. However, the rise of an ageing society has posed a spate of serious concern for the future such as the pension problem. The end of the Cold War has invited the advent of mega-competition through the global expansion of market economies on one hand and a surge of neo-nationalism on the other, leading to such disturbing phenomena after 9.11 as the current situation in Iraq. Meanwhile, the advancement of information technology has opened up a range of opportunities: greater potential for economic dynamism, quicker and broader dissemination of information, diversified values, emergence of players including NPOs, and active discussion over corporate social responsibility. Given the growing physical constraints placed upon the earth, it is imperative to accelerate international negotiations on climate change as well as other processes, including the World Summit on Sustainable Development (WSSD), and to achieve sustainability through developing a recycling society.

In order to effectively address such global problems and continue on the path toward development, all human knowledge and wisdom should be put together immediately so that all nations and ethnic groups around the globe can take concerted action for resolution. Thus, we pledge to work to the utmost to fulfill our mission, keeping in mind that our activities could help contribute to sort out universal challenges for all mankind. We also hope that our new project to succeed and develop the basic philosophy of the EXPO 2005 will be conducive to a sustainable society where natural providence is duly respected-a goal advocated in the EXPO 2005 with one of its themes, "Nature’s Wisdom." To that end, we sincerely wish to ask for your continued understanding and support for our activities of the present and the future.